Marias Gamesa Launches Cafecito con Marias Gamesa to Connect, Inspire and Uplift Latina Moms

Eight in ten Latina moms welcome more virtual support from other Latina moms, but only a third belong to an online community, according to Gamesa®’s recent survey. Cafecito con Marias Gamesa®️ aims to help bridge this gap.
Marias Gamesa launches Cafecito con Marias Gamesa to provide moms with connection, community and space to have honest conversations on the realities of Latina motherhood.

When it comes to raising the next generation of bicultural children, Latina moms are looking for less judgment from loved ones, more support from other moms, and an occasional day off (Mother’s Day doesn’t count!) to help them parent with confidence. According to a new survey from the beloved Mexican cookie brand Marias Gamesa, key factors like family pressures, unrealistic societal standards, and inability to talk openly about their parenting experience have Latina moms seeking new virtual connections to those navigating similar issues. To create a new safe space for moms, Marias Gamesa is launching Cafecito con Marias Gamesa, a month-long virtual village of support providing moms with the opportunity to pause, connect and share real-life advice with each other no matter where they are.

The virtual village will kick off with the Marias Gamesa Squad, a group of four Latina content creators and moms who will ignite the conversation through virtual #CafecitoConMariasGamesa social poston TikTok and Instagram. Joined by Ana Patricia Gámez, entrepreneur, TV personality, mother of two, and host of popular podcast Sin Filtro, the Marias Gamesa Squad will invite Latina moms everywhere to take a “cafecito break” and join in on the conversation. The Marias Gamesa Squad includes: sports reporter and podcaster Antonella Gonzalez, food enthusiast and recipe creator Alejandra Tapia, comedy content creator Maritere Castellanos Esteve, and lifestyle and fashion expert, entrepreneur and shopping expert Maria Claudia.

“Gamesa is proud to launch the campaign Cafecito con Marias Gamesa to celebrate Latina moms on Mother’s Day and beyond. As a brand rooted in celebrating motherhood, it felt natural to create a space where moms can connect and feel supported through the power of cafecito breaks,” said Gustavo Cecilio, Senior Marketing Director for the Hispanic Business Unit, PepsiCo Foods North America. “We want to encourage moms to gather and talk openly about their experiences, reminding them that they are supported by a great community. Having Marias Gamesa cookies serve as the connector for this virtual village of support is our way of honoring moms everywhere.”

The Cafecito con Marias Gamesa campaign is a virtual twist on the long-standing tradition of “cafecito breaks” within the Hispanic community. During this time, friends and family come together to have an informal conversation. The rise of social media and technology has created an opportunity for Latina moms to take these breaks into a virtual setting and gather other perspectives beyond their immediate circle. Ana Patricia Gámez and the Marias Gamesa Squad will honor this tradition in a virtual setting using #CafecitoConMariasGamesa to discuss topics such as parenting, self-care, seeking support, cultural traditions, and more across their social channels. They will also join Ana Patricia Gámez’s podcast Sin Filtro as guests to continue the conversation.

“I’m excited to partner with Marias Gamesa to launch Cafecito con Marias Gamesa. Being a mom raising a bicultural family in the U.S. comes with a unique set of challenges and opportunities,” said Gámez. “It’s important for moms to know that they’re not alone in this journey and that their feelings are valid and shared. Through Cafecito con Marias Gamesa, we are giving Latina moms the extra dose of energy and positive affirmation that they need and deserve.”

Cafecito con Marias Gamesa will cover a wide range of topics impacting Latina moms today, which are grounded in insights from the brand’s recent survey. Gamesa asked 500 Latina moms about their approach to motherhood including, prioritizing self-care, seeking support and reinventing cultural traditions in a new era of parenting. Some of the key findings include:

Parenting Pressures & New Forms of Support

  • Half of Latina moms feel pressure from their family about their parenting style – this pressure is felt more amongst moms aged 25-35.
  • Three quarters of Latina moms feel that they are being held to unrealistic societal standards as moms.
  • Just over half (52%) of these moms agree it’s hard to talk about motherhood challenges with family, leading them to seek new forms of advice, such as online support, from other Latina moms facing similar issues.

Preserving Culture & Raising Confident Kids

  • Moms are passing along their heritage to their children, namely through food, time spent with friends/family from a similar country, music or language.
  • Self-acceptance and education are the most important values these moms want to pass down to their kids.

Prioritizing Their own Health & Happiness

  • When asked about what self-care means to them, doing activities they love and spending time alone scored highest.
  • However, time and money are the biggest barriers to fulfilling these self-care moments for Latina moms.

These findings and more will be explored during Ana Patricia Gámez’s Sin Filtro podcast in the coming weeks. Fans are invited to join in the conversation on social media using #CafecitoConMariasGamesa to share their own motherhood stories and join the virtual village of support for moms, by moms.

For more information about Marias Gamesa, please visit www.gamesacookies.com.

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